Lebanon Valley College Study Abroad

A Walk in Valladolid

Becoming acquainted with Valladolid has proved a fun and eye-opening experience over the past few days. In the three days I have been here I have probably walked the city at least twice each day and while I can easily find my way around without a map, there is still so much more to explore. Valladolid was officially founded in the Middle Ages, however there is substantial evidence that people lived here long before then, explaining the rich and extensive history of the city. For orientation today, one of our professors took us on a brief tour of the city explaining major landmarks and plazas. To begin, we started at our university, Universitas Castellae, which is located in a plaza called la plaza del viejo coso. Its construction dating back to the 1800’s, this plaza was the first bull ring in Valladolid, clear from its architecture. After a larger ring was constructed, la plaza was converted into a prison years later. Today this charming area houses apartments and our classrooms.

Universitas Castellae

Universitas Castellae

Walking is a way of life here in Valladolid, and as we continued on our tour Patricia, our professor, pointed out various monuments, parks, and churches. There are so many impressive churches here, honestly I’m not even sure which one is the cathedral because they all look equally grandiose. Might I add, neither of these are the cathedral of Valladolid.

Santa María La Antigua

Santa María La Antigua

 

Iglesía de San Pablo

Iglesía de San Pablo

In addition to the endless history of this city, Valladolid has many claims to fame even today. There are a number of museums here, some the best in the country. During Easter, or la Semana Santa, Valladolid produces impressive sculptures honoring the holiday. People come to Valladolid from all over the world during la Semana Santa just to see these sculptures. For some reason this city also attracts motor heads who come from numerous nations across the globe to ride their motorcycles called “pingüinos.” Additionally Valladolid is known for its gastronomy, tapas, and hopping nightlife (which I can’t wait to discover for myself). Although there is no place like home, I don’t think I will have any trouble adjusting to the lively and exciting city of Valladolid.

Adios,

McKenna Lupold

First week of clinical!

We arrived at 8am at Instituto Prosperius Tiberino on Monday which is a 5 min drive from our place. We had orientation and received a uniform (aka scrubs), which can be washed every 3 days. I was the only student sharing an instructor (with Kristin) until this upcoming week. Some of us (including me) are working 8-4:30pm each day with 1.5 hours for lunch. Because we have very limited documentation (especially the English speaking students), this means we have a lot of free time during the lunch period!

Even though we only worked 4 days this week due the the holiday on Wednesday, I have learned so much! I will be in inpatient orthopedics for 4 weeks and then switch instructors for inpatient neurology. I have learned a lot of variations for similar techniques that I have learned in the states, but I also learned a lot of new things that I have never experienced before. I have noticed quite a few differences overall between each country and how they conduct PT:

For orthopedics, one PT does not do evaluation, manual therapy, aquatherapy, and therapeutic exercise for each patient. Instead, they have stations. So one PT performs only manual therapy all day. So for me and Kristin, we are in manual for the entire 4 weeks.

  • For orthopedics, one PT does not do the evaluation, manual therapy, aquatherapy, and therapeutic exercise for each patient. Instead, they have stations. So for example, one PT performs only manual therapy all day/everyday. So for me and Kristin, we are at the manual station for the entire 4 weeks.
  • In America, we have specific electrical stimulation pads for each patient (each patient keeps their pads and reuses them each time they need stim), but here they are too expensive in Italy for every patient to have their own, so they reuse each pad after every use for every patient (use the same pads for every patient). They put a medium (gel) on the skin and then place the pads on the skin.
  • It seems that Italians are very open and aren’t too concerned with privacy or personal space. At any given time, you can glance around the gym and see patients sitting side by side with their pants around their ankles with the estim on! They are wearing bathing suits underneath their clothes, and they do place a cloth by their privates, but their entire thigh and leg is exposed. You would never see this in the US.  Their thighs would be covered or they would be in a private room.
    • Patients are often known to kiss their PTs out of appreciation and nobody looks twice (except us Americans of course).
  • Walkers are quite different here too. They have axillary walkers that they use often, where there are pads for the patient to put under their armpits to take weight off their arms as well as their legs when they have weightbearing precautions. I have yet to see people with a normal walker.  I also haven’t seen patients or people in the street with axillary crutches for their injury. They all have loftstrands (forearm crutches).
  • Patients were talking about a Zebra crossing. I did not know there were zebras in Italy! But then I realized that in Italy, they use the term “zebra crossing” to mean a crosswalk because it is black and white striped!

~Jordan

The Adventure Begins…

It still hasn’t hit me that I will be living in a foreign country for the next 4 months!! The past two days have been a complete whirlwind as I packed, double and triple checked my bags, and made my way to the Philly airport to depart for Madrid. Saying goodbye to my mother and twin brother, Matt, yesterday was certainly emotional but they both reassured me I was making the right decision and that I would have an experience of a lifetime. In addition, Matt wisely advised me (as usual) to learn something new each day and to soak up everything. After saying our goodbyes, the five of us from LVC worked our way through the airport and eventually boarded our plane. Luckily, Alisha and I were seated next to two young women, that currently live in Spain but had once studied abroad. Both originally from the U.S., they gave us helpful tips and suggestions about what to do around Spain, how to handle meeting our host families, and how to deal with homesickness. They told us that after studying abroad, you have no idea where life will take you. The flight was only around 6.5 hours, but of course it felt like much longer. In addition, we lost 6 hours due to the time difference so we were all exhausted by the time we arrived in Madrid, where we met Sergio, ecstatic to see us. Here, we also picked up three more students from across the U.S. who will be joining us for the semester. Next, Sergio shuttled us onto a small bus and we began our 2.5 hour bus ride to Valladolid (north of Madrid), the city where we will be living and studying. Drowsy and disoriented we napped the majority of the trip and when I opened my eyes we were in Valladolid! I didn’t even have time to be nervous or think about what to say to my host family. Sergio called my name first and my host dad, Miguel, greeted me with a peck on each cheek and we were off, walking to my new home. Surprisingly, small talk with my host dad came naturally as we walked about 15 minutes to the apartment building. I got a quick tour and was introduced to Ana, my 14 year old host sister and the cute little dog Lula. This left only one more family member to meet: my host mom, Sara. I dropped off my bags and we headed to Sara’s store where she sells fabric, needles, and her impressive crocheting. She was just as excited to meet me and she instantly hooked her arm around mine, and told me not to worry. I am excited to see what the next few days will bring as we tour the city and spend more time with our host families!

Adios,

McKenna Lupold

Part II: New Home

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vigne Di Pace:

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Vigne Di Pace

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On January 2nd, my mom and I headed to the airport where she departed for the United States, and I met Kristin Fitti-Hafer and 5 other girls from the US to head to Umbertide, Umbria for our clinical. We had trouble finding where our rental car was supposed to pick us up, and the people in the airport did not know where we were to go nor were they very nice. When we first arrived at the place, we were completely in shock; it was a dump, until we realized that we were at the wrong place!

Roommates:

-3 girls:  Georgia State

-1 girl:  St. Louis

-1 girl:  San Antonio

-Love them all, can’t wait to live and travel with them the next two months!

Housing:

-Working vineyard with apartments and a dinning room that serves breakfast, lunch, & dinner.

-If we call in advance, we can get dinner & breakfast for a total of 15 euros!

-4 of us are in one apartment and 3 in the other

-At first, we had no heat, didn’t know how to work the stove or the wash!

-In Italy, they do not use dryers and their washers are the smallest things you’ve ever seen!

Orientation:

-We all met in one of the apartments and discussed all the logistics of the experience. We got all the numbers in case of emergencies or people to contact when we need travel planning help.

Shopping:

-Our head coordinator took us to the mall on Sunday night. It was so packed around 7pm! The prices in the supermarket are so cheap for better quality. I absolutely love the blackberry jam. It has actual crushed; so fresh.

~Jordan

Pompei & Napoli

Vesuvius from our bus

Vesuvius from our bus

Mt. Vesuvius from Pompeii

Mt. Vesuvius from Pompeii

Preserved casted dog

Preserved casted dog

Preserved casted 14 year old boy

Preserved casted 14 year old boy

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Napoli Coast

Napoli Coast

Napoli coast

Napoli coast

Pompeii remain

Pompeii remain

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Napoli coast

Napoli coast

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Our last day trip, last Thursday, consisted of a 3-hour bus ride to Pompeii, while stopping for a short time in Naples (Napoli). The Napoli coast was beautiful! From there you could see Capri! My mother and I were shocked to find out how big the city of Pompeii actually was. The tour guide said it would take 3 days to be able to view the entire city so we only saw the important spots. The view of Mt. Vesuvius was amazing and quite daunting. We did end up seeing our friends from Australia on a stop along the way to Napoli. We thought we would see them again once in Pompeii (since we thought it was small), but we ended up never seeing them again!

Facts:

Napoli:

-Capital of the Italian region Campania and the third-largest municipality in Italy

-Contains one of the most important ports in Italy

Pompeii:

-Mostly destroyed and buried under 13 to 20 ft of volcanic ash and pumice in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD.

-20,000 people fled the city & 2,000 died

-Scientists injected a chemical under the ash to preserve the bones of the deceased

Mt. Vesuvius:

-Today, it is regarded as one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world because of the 3,000,000 people living nearby and its tendency to have explosive eruptions.

 

~Jordan

ROME

City streets

City streets

The altar with Bernini's baldacchino

The altar with Bernini’s baldacchino

Triumphal Arch

Triumphal Arch

Trevi Fountain

Trevi Fountain

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Colosseum

Colosseum

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Roman Forum

Roman Forum

Colosseum

Colosseum

St. Peter's Basilica

St. Peter’s Basilica

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Pope's blessing

Pope’s blessing

Spanish Steps

Spanish Steps

Sorry I haven’t posted in a while! I have been switching gears a little bit with travel and moving into my apartment, which I will mention in another post.

Rome, overall, was my favorite city. It was like Florence in a sense that the streets were lined with various higher and lower end shops, but Rome had much more elaborate historical buildings right in the city center: (Pantheon, Trevi Fountain, Coliseum, Vatican, etc).

My two favorite experiences were visiting the Colosseum (so cool to see its beauty in person) and then the Vatican for the second time. On New Year’s Day we headed to the Saint Peter’s Basilica and caught the tail end of the New Years Mass by Pope Francis! Little did we know the pope would appear from his window to give the audience a blessing!

Facts:

Pantheon:

-Built 118-128 AD

-World’s largest unreinforced concrete dome

-Since the 7th century, it has been used as a church dedicated to St. Mary and the Martyrs

Trevi Fountain:

-86 ft high and 161.3 ft wide

-Largest Baroque fountain in the city and one of the most famous fountains in the world.

-The fountain connects three roads (tre vie) and marks the terminal point of the “modern” Acqua Vergine, the revived Aqua Virgo, one of the aqueducts that supplied water to ancient Rome.

Colosseum:

-Built of concrete and sand, it is the largest amphitheatre ever built and is considered one of the greatest works of architecture and engineering ever

-The Colosseum could hold, it is estimated, between 50,000 and 80,000 spectators

-Free admission for all, but spectators still had to get tickets and assigned seats

-The poor did not get assigned seats and sat near the top.

-Fires were likely due to the poor who prepared their hot food in the theatre seats

-Much of the colosseum building blocks were taken to build other Roman structures

-Used for gladiator fights. In most cases, one gladiator must die in each fight!

Vatican City:

-Smallest internationally recognized independent state in the world by both area and population.

-Within the Vatican City are cultural sites such as St. Peter’s Basilica, the Sistine Chapel and the Vatican Museums.

-Features some of the world’s most famous paintings and sculptures.

-Supported financially by the sale of postage stamps and tourist mementos, fees for admission to museums, and the sale of publications.

Saint Peter’s Basilica:

-One of the largest churches in the world

-Catholic tradition holds that the Basilica is the burial site of St. Peter, the chief of Christ’s Apostles and also the first Pope

-Supposedly, St. Peter’s tomb is directly below the high altar of the Basilica. For this reason, many Popes have been interred at St. Peter’s since the Early Christian period.

Sistine Chapel:

Today it is the site of the Papal conclave, the process by which a new pope is selected. The fame of the Sistine Chapel lies mainly in the frescos that decorate the interior, and most particularly the Sistine Chapel ceiling and The Last Judgment by Michelangelo.

~Jordan

 

Cinque Terre

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Tiramisu

Tiramisu

Homemade Pasta with Pesto!

Homemade Pasta with Pesto!

Yesterday we traveled to Cinque Terre by bus! We went to 4/5 lands and had free time at each place. It was not a guided tour, so we were free to roam as we pleased. The weather was absolutely beautiful; at one point we didn’t even need a jacket! Imagine that-the end of December and saying it’s beautiful!  We had lunch at a great place more inland (pictures below).  We met a really nice French couple, but it was so hard to communicate with them (she did save my life when I was almost mauled by a closing gait).

I forgot to mention that on our trip to Pisa, we met two really great people from Downingtown, Pennsylvania! They currently live in Germany, but have traveled all over the world for their job.  They were so gracious to give me their contact information in case I would need anything during my final two weeks in Germany & France.

Facts:

Cinque Terre=5 lands

The Cinque Terre is a rugged portion of coast on the Italian Riviera. It is in the Liguria region of Italy, to the west of the city of La Spezia.

Don’t know much about it’s history, founded by fishermen who don’t keep records! First was used for growing fruits & vegetables like lemons & olives to make Limoncello!

Evolved from the top down.

Comprises five villages: Monterosso al Mare, Vernazza, Corniglia, Manarola, and Riomaggiore.

Over the centuries, people have carefully built terraces on the rugged, steep landscape right up to the cliffs that overlook the sea. 400 steps to the highest village.

Took 200 years to build 10,000 steps on the mountainside. If the steps were lined up side to side, it would be 7,000 km long (about the size of the Wall of China).

The villages were severely affected by torrential rains which caused floods and mudslides on October 25, 2011. Nine people were confirmed killed by the floods, and damage to the villages, particularly Vernazza and Monterosso al Mare, was extensive.

-Jordan

Pisa

LVC reppin'

LVC reppin’

View from top of Pisa

View from top of Pisa

Bells on top of Pisa

Bells on top of Pisa

Pisa

Pisa

Baptistery

Baptistery

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Duomo

Duomo

Duomo

Duomo

Duomo

Duomo

Top of Pisa

Top of Pisa

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Baptistery

Baptistery

Today we headed to Piza one of the trademarks of Italy!!! We were nervous because on the bus ride there it was very foggy, and we were afraid we wouldn’t be able to see it! But the fog quickly cleared, and we were able to capture some great pictures.

Facts: 

The square where these structures are located is called: Piazza Dei Miracoli (which means ‘field of miracles’ or ‘field of dreams’). This is not because miracles occurred here but rather because everything is beautiful here-that is the miracle. 

The Baptistery roof (circular building) is half made of red bricks (closest to the seawater for protection) and the other side is made of lead. This is because during the construction, they ran out of money! 

Famous Gaileo was born in Pisa (not Florence contrary to popular belief) and was baptized in this circular structure!

The duomo (church) is built in the shape of a cross. If one were to do an aerial tour, you would see this. There is a famous pillar inside that they say if you look at it for 5 minutes, you would find love for just that day.

There also is a lamp called the Galileo lamp that hangs down from the tall duomo ceiling. It is a pendulum and that is how Galileo was said to have founded the concept. 

Leaning tower facts:

-Built in 1173 

-Architects unknown! 

-Tower is just an ordinary bell tower that houses 7 bells at the top. 

-Took 3 centuries to build 

-300 steps inside

-58.36 m tall from the foundation

-Weighs 14,453 tons

-Current lean: 5 degrees 

-In 1990, the tower was closed for 11 years in order to try and stabilize the far leaning structure.

Firenze “Florence”

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Ceiling in Gallery

Ceiling in Gallery

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Beautiful architecture

Beautiful architecture

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Piazza del Duomo & xmas tree!

Piazza del Duomo & xmas tree!

View from hotel balcony

View from hotel balcony

Yesterday, we arrived in Firenze (Florence). We toured the Galleria Delgi Uffizi that houses thousands of paintings from the famous painters of the past: Botticelli, Michelangelo, Leonardo DeVinci etc. With our tour, we were able to see a corridor that holds many other famous paintings including around 400 self portraits.  We also passed by the Piazza Del Duomo, the Si Fece Carne, and Basilica San Lorenzo

Facts: 

Most of the paintings in the Uffizi gallery were part of the Medici family’s collection.

Lorenzo de’ Medici (Lorenzo the Magnificent) was an Italian statesman and de facto ruler of the Florentine Republic, who was one of the most powerful and enthusiastic patrons of the Renaissance. He is well known for his contribution to the art world by sponsoring artists such as Botticelli and Michelangelo. His life coincided with the mature phase of Italian Renaissance and his death coincided with the end of the Golden Age of Florence. He is buried in the Medici Chapel in Florence.

Some of the paintings featured women with large foreheads.  Women used to pluck their hair near their forehead to make them have bigger foreheads!

In the private corridor, there were two paintings that were severely destroyed and barely recognizable. This destruction was due to a bombing that occurred outside the gallery in 1993 by the Italian Mafia. They did not reconstruct these in order to keep them as a remembrance of the attacks.  

Basilica San Lorenzo was the first cathedral of Florence

Venice!

San Marco's Square

San Marco’s Square

Venice Tower

Burano

Burano

Burano

Burano

Gondola

Tower

Burano

Burano

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Gnocchi with Salmon Sauce

Gnocchi with Salmon Sauce

Piazza San Marco

Piazza San Marco

Best pizza ever!!!

Best pizza ever!!!

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Buon Natale!!!

Yesterday, Christmas Eve, was a great day in Venice! In the morning, we went on a “Venice City Walking Tour” and then did an afternoon Island tour (Murano, Torcello, & Burano). Murano is known for its glass making. We went to one of the glass factories and saw the making of a beautiful vase. The owner took my mom and I upstairs by ourselves and showed us the private collection. He wanted us to buy something…but they were very cheap (some $6,000)!!! I learned so many amazing things about the city (facts at the bottom).

During the Island tour we met a mother and son from Australia and ended up going out to dinner and midnight mass with them! They were really exciting people and it was so cool to share cultural experiences with them. We actually plan on meeting up with them in Rome for New Years! The Australian son now lives in South France and has traveled all over the world minus the United States!

The four of us went to Piazza San Marco (Saint Mark’s Basilica) for midnight Christmas Eve mass. It was held in 4 different languages: Italian, English, German, and French. Definitely something I will remember forever.

Tomorrow we head to Florence!

Facts:

Venice is made up of 118 islands!

The Grand Canal that flows through Venice flushes 2x/day with new fresh water. This is why there are parts of the day with high and low tide. During certain periods of the year, tides get so high and flood the city. Raised wooden walkways are placed all around the alleys for people to walk on.

Saint Marks Basilica took 250 years to build! Each of the paintings on the walls and ceilings were made by fingernail sized tiles!

Gondoliers make 80 euros per HALF hour tax free! (I think I found my new calling in life)

Venice has 0% crime, poverty, and unemployment rate! There hasn’t been a murder in 35-37 years!

The canals that run through the city used to be the sewer system until 1979!!! That’s one stinky city.

-Jordan Zelechoski