Lebanon Valley College Study Abroad

A Day At the Hot Springs and Shadowing Isn’t All Fancy Surgeries

June 8th: Today we got a day off from the hospital to have a tour around Oursense and go to a private spa with hot springs!  The tour was given by a tour guide and we were shown many main points in the city both today and historically.  We walked around town and were shown different popular shopping areas, one of which was the marketplace.  The marketplace consisted of one larger central building surrounded by many smaller, individual stands selling various items.  One thing I thought was weird is that the fish was stored on ice and was out in the open as opposed to being behind clear glass or plastic case.  After that, we went to Las Burgas, hot springs that are in the city of Ourense – they are VERY hot.  Displaying IMG_3539.JPGLas Burgas!They also have mineral properties that can resolve certain skin conditions.  While we were there and the tour guide was talking, people would come and fill up containers of water to take home and quickly run their hand through the water and rub it on their skin.  After that we went to the main cathedral in Ourense (Catedral de Ourense).  I’ve never seen a more beautiful church ever!  catedral de ourenseThe tour guide said it was also used as a fortress because Ourense is so close to the border of Portugal.  catedral de ourense 3After a group lunch, we took the “spa” train to a private spa with hot springs!  Train to the Hot Springs!As a rule, we could not take pictures of the spa because it was private, but the surrounding area was beautiful!  View Next To Private SpringsThe hot springs also contained the same mineral properties that the tour guide talked about in Ourense (the surrounding area of Ourense also has a very large number of natural hot springs).  We were allotted two relaxing hours in the spa; after which we reluctantly left the spa, but we all had very smooth skin!

Atlantis Project crew on Train to the Hot Springs!

Atlantis Project crew on Train to the Hot Springs!

After returning from the spa, one of the things I had for dinner is what I would consider the Spanish equivalent to mozzarella sticks; they were called “triangulos quesos” and were served with a very sweet tomato and pesto sauce.  Yum!Triangulos de Queso

 

 

June 9th: Today at the hospital was the first day that I did not follow the doctor I’m shadowing this week into the OR; instead, she was seeing patients today – and she had approximately 56 on her list!  The way this was set up was very different from the U.S.; all the patients (a lot of them) waited in a large waiting area and waited to be “buzzed” into the doctor’s office based on their number (it reminded me somewhat of being called at the deli line).  The patient enter the doctor’s office, a room with a desk, computer, chair for the doctor, chairs for the patient and guest, and an examination table.  The doctor sat on one side of the desk typing notes while talking to the patient who sat on the other side of the desk.  More often than not, the patient would then be examined for whichever urological ailment they were in the office for.  The major thing that was very different from the United States is the time that the doctor spent with each patient: sometimes it was as little as about five minutes with almost none lasting longer than about twenty minutes!  This goes back to the differences between Spanish and American health care systems; health care is “free” because it’s included in people’s taxes.  Which leads me to the feeling that more people go to the doctor more often which leads to many patients to be seen.  I believe there may have been one other doctor tackling the list of the 56 patients for the day, but I’m not exactly sure.  All I know is that I saw a lot of different patients in the span of time I was there.  The number of patients I saw today was much larger than the number of patients the internal medicine doctors I shadow back home see in a day.  My doctor was extremely busy today and therefore couldn’t translate what was going on after she saw each patient, but from what I got out of the conversations (which were very fast – too fast and complicated for my years of high school and one year of college Spanish to comprehend everything), the majority of the patients did not have an issue, it was either more of a check-in or because an issue they thought they had.  Of course, there were a few that I saw that did have a problem.  During an endoscopic check for bladder cancer in one man, the doctor did find cancer and it was actually that patient’s second time having bladder cancer.

While I did not get the “thrill” of being in the OR today, I learned many valuable things today, most importantly the differences between Spain and America’s health care systems and what that translates to for everyday patient care.  It also put some things in prospective: I tend to get annoyed when the doctor is late for my appointment or I have to wait, but the people in Spain wait a long time to see the doctor for just a short amount of time, nothing compared to some of my very long and thorough doctor visits when I’m sick.  Also, today was important because it highlighted that medicine isn’t all exciting surgery; sometimes you need to meet with nonsurgical patients, even if the length of the list is intimidating and you’d rather be in a surgery.

Later that evening, we had a group dinner with all the fellows and the site coordinator to talk about our day.  Also, it was one of the student’s birthday!  So of course, we all had a celebratory glass of sangria!

June 10th: Back to the OR!  Today I got to see three procedures!  The first was an endoscopic procedure to get a sample from the kidney (through the urethra, bladder, ureter, to the kidney) to check for kidney cancer.  The second was to break up a kidney stone; it was really amazing to watch the laser break up the kidney stone so it could be pulled out of the patient, I actually got to see the kidney stone – strange to think that such a little thing can cause so much pain!  The next patient also had a kidney stone; however, the ureter was very narrow in this patient and the doctors had to put in a catheter-like tube to enlarge the ureter so they could go back in and remove the stone at a later date.  This was my last day in Urology, even though my doctor said I could come back anytime I want; while I did enjoy urology and all the surgeries I got to see, I should give the other specialties I’ve been assigned to a chance too!  After leaving the hospital late in the afternoon, I treated myself to churros and chocolate (probably my favorite thing that I’ve eaten so far) and a late siesta which was much needed after this busy week.

Churros and Chocolate!

Churros and Chocolate!

Homesick

       
  Now I know what you’re thinking; she’s homesick?! It has only been 4 weeks! The answer is no, I am not homesick for home but rather for places I’ve never been and that I desire to see. This past month has changed my outlook on the world and has sparked a new kind of desire in me; the desire to experience as many different cultures and meet as many people as possibly. Perhaps Michael Palin’s quote will better explain my thoughts..
“Once the travel bug bites there is no known antidote, and I know I will be happily infected until the end of my life”
This past weekend I had the opportunity to travel to Rome, visit a beach in Italy, and see some amazing historic sights. Rome was an experience that I truly am unable to put into words; from the Colosseum, to the Trevi Foutain, to St. Peters Basilica, the food, the gelato, and the quaint restaurant, Rome has so much to offer. What an incredible city! If it wasn’t a busy week filled with finals I would definitely post a blog about the experience but feel free to ask me about it; i’ll probably talk your ear off!
Although cliche; I am not returning to the states the same person I left. I have left my heart in so many places. Often when I talked to people at home they say “nothing has changed here, same old same old, you’re the one across the world.” I have thought about that for awhile now and I counter it by saying you don’t have to travel across the world to try new things. You can do something new everyday no matter where you are at. For instance, I can’t have the same experiences my sister is having in PA, every place offers a new challenge or opportunity to grow that can’t be offered anywhere else. BUT if you have the chance to experience a new place, DO IT. It is amazing to go to a place where no one knows your name and you get to start completely new and build new roots. But don’t listen to what I say, go see and experience it for yourself! Even if you don’t have the chance such as studying abroad available in your school like I did, find a way, make an opportunity! Often people I talk to say they don’t have money, but by the time they have money you wont have time, and when you have time and money you’ll be “too old” (although you are never too old to travel). Just make it happen, I promise the money and time you spend traveling will make your life richer. Jobs may fill your pockets, but adventure fills your soul. As my grandfather always says “you can’t take your money to the grave with you”.
“If you think adventure is dangerous, try routine; its lethal.”
I often referred to this website during my study abroad experience. If you need advice or want to be inspired to travel this blog offers tips on everything on how to save, where to start and what to do! Check it out, and if you click away because you don’t have time to check it out, ask yourself if not now when will you?      http://www.nomadicmatt.com/getting-started-new/
Although I must come back, I realize that its not the same thing as never leaving. I may be done with school, but this exit is an entry to traveling the next week with two of my friends. Finally, I would like to thank LVC for the opportunity to go abroad and Jill Russel for helping me find a way.
I asked each of the 10 students if they had something to say about the trip and here is what they said..
Studying abroad was something I knew I wanted to do when I started college, but I could’ve never imagined the experience being as incredible as it was. I learned so much inside the classroom and out, met so many people, and visited more countries in four weeks that I previously had my entire life. I won’t be the same returning to LVC–I have so much more perspective on the world, and I have 9 great new friends who I share so many incredible memories with.- Devon Malloy

Wow! Hard to find words for what just happened.. was a once of a life time experience that was surreal. I visited five different countries in just four weeks and had the time of my life. One thing that that is compelling to me is how unique everyone’s story is. It just goes to show that everyone truly had the ability to make this study abroad experience whatever they wanted it to be! Till next time Europe.. budapest… mic drop.–Blake Lutz

I transferred into LVC this spring semester and never in a million years would I have seen myself traveling the world with an amazing group of people from Lebanon Valley and Xavier. These memories and friendships I have made will last a lifetime and I wouldn’t change it for the world. To people that are questioning if they ever want to study abroad- DO IT. You’ll never regret it. Even though you go outside your comfort zone, its a truly amazing experience. I traveled to Budapest Hungary, Brussels Belgium, Amsterdam Netherlands, Munich Germany, London England, and Dublin Ireland. I truly wish I could stay here a whole semester, because a month isn’t enough. I wasn’t really friends with the people from LVC before the trip but I guarantee that I will be as close returning as I am now. I didn’t know what to expect meeting the Xavier kids but after spending a month with them I felt like I have known them my whole life. Booking flights, hotels, hostels, trains, buses, taxes, made me a lot more confident not only traveling but in myself as young man. Lastly, to our Professor Will Delavan and Jill Russel, thank you for the opportunity. I guarantee that you have sparked a journey of traveling that I will carry on the rest of my life. Sincerely, Nicholas A. Tucker.
Even though you have the amazing opportunity to visit lots of countries while studying abroad, don’t forget to take in the many wonders that Maastricht has to offer. It is truly an incredible city that I’ve been lucky enough to call my home for the past month, and it will always hold a special place in my heart.
–Jillian McCue
Make your dreams happen. I have been privileged enough to go on this journey and I have made amazing friends along the way. I was was able to accomplish and go after my dreams. I have finally made a trip to Italy and now I will never be the same. Explore the world, try new things, and get involved in new cultures. Take new leaps and bounds because I know I will never forget it. Explore the world and be open to new things.–Marla Scacchitti
This trip has been an amazing experience and has taught me so many things about myself. Being able to navigate foreign places and immersing myself in other cultures has allowed me to grow as an individual. It has improved my confidence more than I could ever imagine. Having the opportunity to take in all the beauty that this wonderful part of the world has to offer has been amazing. I am so happy that I decided to come on this trip, it has been such a great experience. To the LVC and Xavier students, thank you for making this trip a wonderful one filled with memories I’ll never forget. The friendships that I’ve made here will be for a lifetime as we have grown so close over a short time. To Will and Jill, thank you so much for this opportunity. It was more rewarding than I ever thought it would be. To all future MU students. Enjoy the time you have here, it is a beautiful part of the world and your time here will be gone sooner than you think.— Brandon McMinn
After hearing stories of my friends and their study abroad adventures, I decided to look into a European vacation myself. I was lucky enough to have family that were more than willing to help me accomplish my dream of studying abroad. During my time here I have gained knowledge than I can explain. I have also gained friends that I know I will continue to hang out with and make memories with. I am forever thankful for LVC giving me this amazing opportunity. Thanks to the students, LVC and Xavier, that make this trip more than I could hope for.–Gianna Rossillo

Get a bike and most certainly travel every weekend but don’t forget to appreciate the town of Maastricht and walk through the streets if you have time, yes walk don’t bike. My problem which I just realized now after selling my bike and having to walk was that I viewed Maastricht as more of a place where I had my bed and had to take classes rather than yet another beautiful and special city of its own to explore and you can’t take this in as well rushing around on the back of a bike. So my greatest advice would be to purchase a bike as soon as possible, as this will help you be able to wake up for class 15 minutes before and be on time as well as make it super easy to get to the train station but for a leisurely stroll around the city, walk. It won’t hurt you being that you won’t eat the healthiest and it lets you take in the culture a lot more. Don’t be afraid to get lost, that’s what a gps and data plans are for. Also if you end up finding your way with a little help from others and mostly on your own, it is pretty damn satisfying. Branch out and make friends with not only LVC kids you didn’t know but all of the people you encounter here. Do new things and travel to crazy places because at the end of the day you will not regret anything except maybe dropping too much money on a late Friday or Saturday night. All in all this will rank at the top of experiences you’ve had up to this point in your life so appreciate every second of it. You will build life long relationships with people you never thought you would. A month may seem long but it truly flies by. Thank you to everyone who helped me along the way and gave me this amazing opportunity. Jill, professor Delavan, fellow LVC students, and Xavier students you have made this something I will never forget.— Evan Lysczek

I would tell every student to step out of their comfort zone and study abroad if they are given the chance. I’ve had the opportunity to make many new friends, lifelong memories, and explore the world. It’s truly an experience you’ll never forget. -Aaron Alexander

 

From a Big Fish in a Pond to a Small Fish in an Ocean

Friday June 3rd:  I arrived at the Madrid airport in the morning with two other Atlantis Project fellows that I (thankfully) met before getting on the plane in Philadelphia.  After grabbing my luggage and getting through customs, which went so much smoother than I thought it would, I was greeted by an Atlantis Project Coordinator who was gathering students that were arriving at the Madrid airport around that time.

Walking through Madrid Airport!

Walking through Madrid Airport!

From there, we were taken by bus to the hotel that we’d be staying in for orientation weekend.  We had the afternoon to walk around the nearby mall and get food.  Surprisingly, the mall was very similar to an American mall and even had a large number of American stores.  Today reminded me a little of the first day of college; fellows were from all over the United States and Puerto Rico, so very few people knew each other before coming to Madrid and everyone was trying to make friends for the weekend and the rest of their fellowship.  However, one thing very different from making friends during orientation weekend at school is there was a much wider variety of people from a variety of places, as opposed the large central Pennsylvania and surround area population of LVC students.  Most of the fellows come from very large schools that they don’t consider to be “that big” (I couldn’t believe someone thought a student body of 20,000 was average). Luckily, my new friends and I weren’t so horribly jet lagged that we made it through the whole day without sleeping, but going to bed later that night did feel amazing.

Quick picture with some fellows during a walk in the park near our hotel!

Quick picture with some fellows during a walk in the park near our hotel!

Saturday June 4th: Today was orientation day and all the students (approximately 75, I’m not sure of the exact number) sat in a meeting room in the hotel in which we listened to speakers reiterate the purpose of the Atlantis Project (which is to allow students to have shadowing opportunities they might not get in the U.S. – for those of you who don’t know, getting a doctor to shadow can be like pulling teeth if you don’t have a connection with one – and to allow students to see how a different country’s health care system operates), go over important cultural differences to be aware of, talk about some economical differences between the United States’ health care system and Spain’s health care system, and a current medical student gave advice for getting in to medical school.  One thing I found interesting was the difference in health care systems.  Spain’s health care system is a largely public system which is paid for by taxes.  The amount people pay for taxes varies based on income and other related things, and health care is regulated by the central government, sets policies for all areas, and regional government, sets policies for that specific area.  There was then discussion on which health care system is better? United States or Spain?  While the United States has a more expensive health care system, Americans have a lower life expectancy but they do have a higher health condition than Spaniards.  We ended the day with a bus trip to Madrid which we were allowed to go off on our own.  One of my favorite places I went to was Plaza Mayor where a group of us got tapas of tortillas and shrimp with sangria, all very delicious!

Plaza Mayor, Madrid

Plaza Mayor, Madrid

Sangria (to share)!

Sangria (to share)!

Tortilla

Tortilla

From taking Spanish before, I did forget that tortillas aren’t chips like we call them in English, but a combination of eggs, potatoes, and cheese.  After exploring the city for a while, my friends and I got a taxi ride back to the hotel to go to bed.

Sunday June 5th: Early in the morning, I got on a bus with fourteen other fellows to head to Ourense, Spain, a city above and close to the boarder of Portugal.  The bus ride took about 6 hours, but I did get to see the beautiful landscape of Spain.  Compared to Pennsylvania, it’s much hillier, and as you’re driving you see a lot of hills, grass, and open land and every now and again clusters of buildings.  When we finally arrived, we talked about what things would be like in the hospital and how our orientation would go tomorrow.

Ourense, Spain!

Ourense, Spain!

The day before we got our assignments for which specialties we’d be shadowing.  The first week I’m with urology, the second I’m in pediatrics, and the third I’m with hematology.  I’m very excited to meet the new doctors and see different specialties.  After meeting with our Site Coordinators, we were free to walk the city of Ourense, which is smaller and much less crowded and busy than Madrid.  I had a delicious (and cheap) meal of breaded chicken, rice, and salad, and I’m finally starting to get used to the Spanish eating times of a lunch around 2 and dinner around 8.  One thing I’m not used to is going to bed at the same time, because of eating dinner later and it being light out so much later here.  But, tomorrow is an early day at the hospital with much to learn so a good night sleep is more than necessary!

Capitol Tales

To all the history buffs, political nerds, and globally minded souls, this blog goes out to you.

My name is Olivia and I am a Senior, Political Science major with Law & Society and potentially Global Studies minors. I chose to take part in a fantastic study away opportunity in the heart the nation’s Capitol over my last Fall semester. The Washington Center provides a comprehensive learn, live, and work experience that trains young professionals through a high-intensity internship and multiple professional development courses. TWC, for short, helped me land my internship at Citi Global Government Affairs, where I am an associate who provides substantial analysis of International Trade and banking regulations to senior ranking officials, and maintains communications with over 100 countries around the world. I had just finished up multiple public sector internships from the Summer, mostly related to Congress, so jumping ship to private international affairs has been quite a change, but I am hopeful to broaden my skills as I approach the real world.

I work on Pennsylvania Ave over 150 above the District, and this is my daily coffee view.

I work on Pennsylvania Ave over 150 feet above the District, and this is my daily coffee view.

I am no newbie to the District, however I have never been a resident. The first couple of days were filled with confusion. The District is an incredibly accessible place, if you remember your four quadrants…

I took an Uber ride for the first time and requested the opposite quadrant from which I lived in, and quickly learned my lesson with a 17 block hike back home. My neighborhood, affectionately called NoMa (Northern Mass. Ave), is full of luxury high-rise apartments and colorful row homes. Northwest is where most Washingtonians work and it is home to Capitol Hill and the National Mall. The other two quadrants sport a plethora of living styles, from completely eco-friendly and green, to the unfortunately run-down and rougher neighborhoods. DC is also incredibly close to Baltimore, College Park, and Silver Spring, Maryland, and Arlington, VA. You would never know you were in  a city less than 10 miles wide because each day you will hear a different language, see a new international flag in your taxi, and eat food from an exotic culture. For a place that seems to be everyone’s temporary residence, I’ve never felt so at home.

I have been in D.C. for just over three full weeks and I have not been able to keep my blogging up to speed with my adventuring. This post is dedicated to the basics.

DC Weeks 1-2 142

Week 1: Train, sleep, walk, speak as many languages as you can, repeat.

Week 1 I helped welcome over 200 international students to Washington, D.C. and got them acquainted with the neighborhood. We gave them metro cards, learned a bit about where they were from, and then taught them how to act like Americans… Naturally, we gave them Five Guys and taught them how to Whip and Nae Nae.

Weekly Tip: When traveling across the National Mall, wear VERY comfy shoes, and bring plenty of water.

TWC Ambassadors in Front of Capitol Hill

TWC Ambassadors in Front of Capitol Hill

 

Week 2: Early birds get the worm at the gym, Starbucks, internships, and at the bar.

Week 2 was all about getting acquainted to your work week. My internship is a 9:00am – 6:00pm grind, complete with a 20 minute metro commute and one hour to network at lunch. I learned how much I truly valued a short walk to class, a couple of people in line for coffee, and the speed of sandwich making. Those things don’t even cover the grueling, yet rewarding research internship I go to four days a week. Thankfully, Lunch and Happy Hours are where the work world tends to shed their structured exterior to relax and break down the dress code or etiquette barriers that so often precede your interactions during business hours. The rest of the week consists of a couple of classes, late Thursdays and mid-day Friday, which luckily, LVC has prepared me very well for. Stay tuned for some interesting projects, D.C. scandals,  and life after business hours coming soon!

The National Mall at night is just as spectacular as it is in the day time

The National Mall at night is just as spectacular as it is in the day time. TGIF!

Week 3: Family dinner and a show

I just finished week 3, and I’ve settled into a weekday routine that is finally manageable between work, class, and friends. I have also seen about half of the National Mall, two concerts, over 10 restaurants, a couple of sporting events, and learned a few conversations in Belgian, Chinese, Portuguese, and Italian, to name just a few highlights. The events may be non-stop in D.C. but I still managed to find time for some beloved visitors from Pennsylvania! On top of that, my TWC family and I cook dinner in our apartment each Tuesday, and invite a good portion of our floor to try some traditional American college food. Now, don’t be dismayed, we have a pretty nice kitchen and a couple of stellar chefs who have whipped up Tex-Mex tacos, Pan-Asian stir fry, and gourmet breakfast for dinner. Dinner is followed by laughing off the work day, making weekend plans, and hopefully starting a pretty great political debate.

Surprise Labor Day visit from my folks and little brother!

Surprise Labor Day visit from my folks and little brother!

SUPRISE Life in Color with some fabulous LVC Alums!

SURPRISE Life in Color with some fabulous LVC Alums!

“Do not stop thinking of life as an adventure. You have no security unless you can live bravely, excitingly, imaginatively; unless you can choose a challenge instead of competence.” – Eleanor Roosevelt

Next time stay tuned for awkward encounters, Trump Rallies, and what it truly means to be a D.C. Native or just a Day Walker…

God Bless,

 

Olivia Edwards

To The Wind

Several days after our generally successful foray to Wellington, we headed back to Lake Taupo, a destination we had always driven near, but never visited, to resolve a bit of unfinished business. In the shadow of Mount Doom sat carvings, inaccessible except by boat, several summer’s of work now condensed into a convenient guided tour. The carvings ranged from the traditional faces of Maori deities to a naked etching of the sculptor’s girlfriend at the time, whom I doubt would be super pleased with the amount of people taking pictures of her stone likeness.

Everyone else kept insisting that it was a carving, not a bust.

Everyone else kept insisting that it was a carving, not a bust.

I had spent study week on a road trip, now, I was determined to spend the whopping two week long finals period for a last bit of cavorting and merriment. For the New Zealanders, many of them retaining an admirable level of post semester motivation, there was plenty of time to study and ensure the preservation of their GPAs. For me, there was plenty of time to seal myself into my room and watch Netflix without that usual annoying obligation to socially interact with other people.

If it had gone much longer, I shudder to think what may have become of my social skills.

If it had gone much longer, I shudder to think what may have become of my social skills.

Continue reading

Bleed Me Dry

Wellington is a city trying very hard to be San Francisco. Between the art deco buildings and the cable car, it’s a wonder that they didn’t import a scale model of the Golden Gate Bridge. Las Vegas certainly doesn’t have the same qualms about monument theft.

What was notable, at least for me, about my arrival to Wellington was my newfound conservancy when it came to spending money. I believe I’ve mentioned before how I’ve been blithely burning through my money on trips and such with the mindset that, as a visitor to a country on the other side of the world, it would be a very, very long time before I returned, if at all. However, the cavalier attitude that I’ve taken towards currency had put me in a bind, and suddenly, the desire to see and do as much as possible was replaced with a vague, gnawing dread that everyone was out to get into the sweet, leather folds of my wallet.

Paid wifi? Yeah, right. City parking? Not likely. Vending machines? What utterly despicable leeches. No, I didn’t care how compelling they were, candy bars hanging seductively against their plastic housing, ladies of the night wrapped in crinkly cellophane.

Fortunately, Wellington offers a number of attractions that are mercifully free, allowing me the chance to hoard my money a little bit longer until I could pull an Ebeneezer Scrooge years in the future.

My ghost of Christmas past was more riddled with alcohol than I remember.

My ghost of Christmas past was more riddled with alcohol than I remember.

Economics aside, I really, sincerely, for real this time, recommend the Wellington museum for its sheer size and sheer lack of required payment. Much of the week had, given the cold and rain, been a slog through a multitude of museums and art galleries, all eager to give you your daily suppository of New Zealand knowledge.

That said, Wellington did something right, in the way it conveyed a subtle mood with its exhibits, through organization, music, and yes, the occasional Lord of the Rings prop, a staple of New Zealand attractions. I may have come dangerously close to learning in that museum, because when we left, I realized that the breeding habits of New Zealand birds had stuck in my mind. You think I’m joking. I’m not.

Trust me, you really don't want to know.

Trust me, you really don’t want to know.

But, for every Wellington, saturated with culture and hipsters, there was a tourist attraction that was slightly under par, trumped up for the sake of the locals with little regard to whether it would be an actual desirable place to visit.

For instance, when we attempted to visit the coveted hill elevator of a sleepy coastal town, we found a deserted concrete tunnel, complete with a single downtrodden bench and an ancient elevator that may very well have been the understudy for the Tower of Terror.

"They say I'll get my own Disney ride in a few years!"

“They say I’ll get my own Disney ride in a few years!”

Although there was an attendant to give us a ride and our guts remained mercifully knife-free, the opportunity to clank on up to a hilltop view of the town that could be accessed by road was pretty overrated.

Once we got even further away from Wellington, into New Zealand’s scenic swathes of farmland, towns didn’t even bother trying to distinguish themselves with a tourist trap, becoming simply, “that town with the one lane bridge” or similar. We had become well acquainted with the country’s rural areas, but hadn’t quite anticipated the desolation of some of these areas, often a few houses with a beaten up sign signaling a nearby school. These were the sleepy little country towns that seemed just remote enough to harbor some kind of dark, Lovecraftian secret.

So come on down to Innsmouth, and meet some friends of mine!

So come on down to Innsmouth, and meet some friends of mine!

But soon, the quality of the buildings and genetic diversity of the people improved, and then immediately took a dive as we arrived in Hamilton. But it was home, and we were exhausted. With only a few loose ends to wrap up, this was our last great expedition through the sheep infested ranges of New Zealand.

Willkommen in Würzburg

I arrived in Würzburg, Germany five days ago and I can already say that this city has stolen my heart. Würzburg is a small city located in Bavaria, Germany in the Franconia region. I will be staying in Würzburg for the entire month of July while I take a German course at the University of Würzburg. During my time in Germany I am staying in a single room in a dorm at the University.

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The past few days have been so busy that we haven’t had much down time. On our first night here we got settled in our rooms and then took the bus downtown to eat as a group in a restaurant that is 700 years old. Many of us did not know each other because the group consists of only one other LVC student, besides myself, one professor from LVC, and eight students and two professors from Hillsdale College in Michigan, so we used this time to get to know each other. We enjoyed a traditional German style meal with Franconia wine, and of course amazing desserts.

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We started class the next day, which goes from 8:30 to 12:30 Monday through Friday. In order to get to class we have to take one of the bus lines downtown, which is about a 10 minute ride from our dorm building. After classes we ate lunch in the main lunch hall of the university, where we will be eating lunch most days. On Thursday afternoon we did a citywide scavenger hunt that took three hours. We learned so much about the culture of the city and how to navigate through it. It is a beautiful city that has a fun, positive vibe.

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My favorite place in the city is the Alte Mainbrücke (Old Main Bridge) which is a foot bridge that goes across the Main River. It has several statutes on it that are historical people of the city. During the day it is a beautiful place to relax and read a book or do homework by the river, and at night it is a fun place to hang out with friends. At night the fortress that is visible from the bridge and the length of the bridge itself are lit up, and there is music and lots of people drinking wine.
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On Friday after classes we visited the Marienberg Fortress that overlooks the entire city and the Alte Mainbücke. We explored the museum inside the fortress as well.
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On Friday night the Kiliani-Volksfest began. Kiliani-Volksfest is a huge festival in Würzburg that honors Saint Kilian and is celebrated for about two weeks. To start off the festivities, the major of Würzburg tapped the first keg that came from the Würzburg Hofbräu, the only brewery in the city. Later in the night there were fireworks for the Festival as well.
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During the day on Saturday there was a huge parade that was for the Kiliani-Volksfest that went through the center of the city that featured tons of German traditions. After the parade, we went to the Juliusspital Winery to go on a tour and taste their wines. Würzburg is known for their wine, especially their white wines, since it is located in a huge wine region in Germany with three huge wineries. While we were at the winery we saw their wooden barrels that they age wine in, some of them were decorated for specific things. There was one where you could climb in it to see how big it was and a few of us went into it.

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At first it was hard to become adjusted to speaking German all the time but it is getting easier now. It is very rewarding to be able to understand and communicate with another person in a language that you have spent so much time studying. There are a lot of small cultural changes in Germany that most people wouldn’t realize unless they visited. For example, stores are not open on Sunday and close early at night, and most places do not take credit cards for payment. The past couple of days have been extremely hot and it is very rare for buildings to have air conditioning in Europe. Our classroom and dorms do not have AC either, and since the weather has been over 90 degrees the past few days it has been very difficult to adapt without AC. It is also something we are getting used to. Hopefully it will start to cool down soon too!

 

Bis später,

Emily

International Criminal Court

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Hello everyone,

Yesterday I experienced the most challenging and difficult time during my abroad experience. I attended the status hearing of suspected Congolese war criminal Bosco Ntaganda at the International Criminal Court in The Hague (Den Haag). Bosco Ntaganda is facing charges of 13 counts of war crime that include: murder, attempted murder; attacking civilians, rape; sexual slavery of civilians; pillaging; displacement of civilians; attacking protected objects; destroying the enemy’s property; and rape, sexual slavery, enlistment and conscription of child soldiers under the age of fifteen years (and using them to participate actively in hostilities) and 5 counts of crimes against humanity.

Bosco Ntagada

Bosco Ntagada

Before going to the actual status hearing we went through security, watched a film and presentation. After asking questions we went to the status hearing where we sat in front of the entire court. I was not expecting to be sitting across from a man who has committed these heartless crimes. The judges sat directly across from us, below them the legal chambers were present, to the right of us were the legal representatives of victims and the prosecution, and to the left of us were the defense, registry, and Bosco.

At one point in time he finally lifted his head during the status hearing and I looked into his eyes. His eyes were empty. I saw no one behind his eyes. Therefore, no matter what happens, found guilty or not guilty, no punishment will ever live up to the crimes he committed. There will never be an amount of time or revenge that will serve justice to the victims and their families. This is what made the court case difficult for me because I could not stop thinking about the people who have been affected by his actions. Toward the end one legal representative of the victims read quotes from the victims and their families, in which I was saw no emotional reaction from Bosco. During the reading my heart pounded and ached for the victims and their families. I am not sure what causes so much hatred or reasoning that justifies his courses of action. In the end his court case is pushed back an additional week upon prosecution’s request due to the need for additional translations. This court case definitely made me rethink what justice truly means.

 

LVC Students at the International Criminal Court

LVC Students at the International Criminal Court

Thank you for reading,

 

Corby Myers

The Flying Dutch Experience

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Hello everyone,

This past weekend was one of my favorite weekends of being here! We traveled by train to Eindhoven. We met up with some of our friends who live in Eindhoven. We went out for dinner at a place called Vapiano’s! The company was developed from previous McDonalds managers who were not happy where they were at and wanted to develop and work under a different vision of serving people. The restaurant has very nice inside interior that allows people to have their own private table and waiters who serve drinks. The only part that is similar to McDonalds is the ordering food process. In order to purchase your meal you get in line, choose your meal/pasta of your choosing, order it, watch the chef cook your food, and swipe your own card that is given to you for the time spent there. You can add food or other beverages to the card throughout your stay at the restaurant. Needless to say we enjoyed our time here and the food was delicious!

 

Vaptianos!

Vapiano’s!

 

Our Cooks!

Our Cooks!

 

The blob!

The small blob! Take notice to the name!

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Inside the actual blob!

Beach Volleyball in Eindhoven!

Beach Volleyball in Eindhoven!

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1 euro vending machine that actually slides your food to you

Eindhoven at night

 

The main reason we came to Eindhoven our final weekend was to attend THE FLYING DUTCH MUSIC FESTIVAL!!! This music festival had the top DJS in the world play music here. We had an absolute blast here! We arrived at the music festival around 2 pm and never stopped dancing until 11 pm. This music festival was not only a great time with the music, but also learning, talking, and building relationships with the local people who live in Eindhoven was a cultural experience!

The DJS who were here!

The DJS who were here!

The stage! This stage also shot out streamers and confetti during the day and fireworks and fire throughout the night.

The stage! This stage also shot out streamers and confetti during the day and fireworks and fire throughout the night.

Sun is setting and the entire place was packed

Sun is setting and the entire place was packed

My temporary free souviner from the Flying Dutch. We thought we were just going to get a star stamped on our wrist, but got toilet instead (please going to the bathroom here is not a privilege and you have to pay to use the bathroom).

My temporary free souviner from the Flying Dutch. We thought we were just going to get a star stamped on our wrist, but got toilet instead (please going to the bathroom here is not a privilege and you have to pay to use the bathroom).

 

During the music festival

During the music festival

You can never go wrong with ending a night with these kind of fries!

You can never go wrong with ending a night with these kind of fries!

 

Thank you for reading,

 

Corby Myers

Places Beyond Belief: Belgium, Germany and Eindhoven

Hello everyone,

On Friday our class had a field trip to Brussels in Belgium! Brussels felt like a “larger” town then Maastricht. At first I felt overwhelmed seeing military police walking around with larger guns. I never saw military police forced in a public setting. I was not sure if I should feel safe or scared. After driving through town we finally arrived at the European Union Parliament building for a tour. I was amazed! I believe we tend to concentrate on the negative aspects of the world so I was amazed that over 751 members who speak 24 different languages come together as a whole and discuss, plan, contain order, and administrate protection, laws, and regulate the countries. Within the European Union there has not been a war within the members of the union since World War II. One negative aspect of the European Union is the language barrier. Our tour guide noted as a joke that if one member is speaking and telling a joke that the interpreter does not know how to translate they will tell their member when to laugh at the joke. Although we can laugh at this example, I cannot imagine how many mistakes are made during these meetings and the loss of value with words spoken that will be missed through translation.

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LVC Crew

LVC Crew

 

 

The next part of our day was participating in a walking tour throughout Brussels and the highlight of the tour was during our walking tour and seeing the “peeing man” statue. I was expecting to see a bigger presence and for the statue to be in the center of the city, but the statue was extremely small and was located down an alley in a corner of a building.  The next picture below you will see a building. It used to operate like New York’s Wall Street, but now the plans are to have the building serve as a beer temple.

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After Brussels I took a train to Bruges! We had to ask a man when to get off because we did not know how to read or communicate in French or Flemish Dutch. He was kind enough to let us know when to get off on our connecting train and which platform to go to next to catch the next train. After arriving in Bruges we had walking and bus directions to our hotel, but we did not realize how open Bruges was going to be. There were no street signs at the train station so we were not sure which direction to go. We started to walk and saw a bus stop and were lucky enough to gain WIFI access.

We were able to connect to google maps, which enabled us to find our hotel. The walk was around 30 minutes long, but felt much longer due to wondering if we were going in the right direction. Once we gained access to our hotel room at Hotel Europ we decided to stay in for the night. The hotel room was not in the worst condition, but we only had one electric outlet and the light bulbs were burnt out. However, the hotel appeared to be clean and was centrally located. The breakfast was also delicious and the view from our room was absolutely perfect because it overlooked a canal.

Our first day in Bruges was fantastic. We saw two weddings, windmills, took a canal tour, went to the 2be beer wall that stored over 1,000 beers, toured an art gallery, went shopping, and finished our night with a carriage ride.

2be beer wall

2be beer wall

Swans were everywhere! It was magical. We also saw two swan nests!

Swans were everywhere! It was magical. We also saw two swan nests!

Part of the contemporary art we viewed

Part of the contemporary art we viewed

During our canal tour the tour guide noted that we were lucky to see this dog relaxing by the window.

During our canal tour the tour guide noted that we were lucky to see this dog relaxing by the window.

Our horse who gave us our tour of the city

Our horse who gave us our tour of the city

Beautiful windmill

Beautiful windmill

After our relaxing and fun time in Bruges it was time to go back home to Maastricht….well that was the plan, but instead we were trapped in the train station due to none of our credit cards working at the train station and no one working at the train station’s information center. These machines do not take cash either. With no WIFI and limited resources we started to ask people to buy our tickets for us and tell them that we would pay them immediately. After being turned down three times finally a nice United Kingdom person bought our tickets for us with their Europe credit card. We were so thankful! We paid them back and sprinted for our train. We made it on the train and caught our next train back to Maastricht!

My next adventure was to Aachen, Germany! Due to it being a holiday and a Sunday all shops were closed, but I had a delicious traditional German meal and toured the town hall! The seats that are located in the meeting room are worth over 2,000 euro each. I learned this from a local and was relieved at the same time I could not sit on a chair that was worth that much!

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Due to the holiday we had an extra day off so I decided to check out Eindhoven in the Netherlands! I did not explore too much due to limited time, but I took a quick tour of the city and my next weekend’s plans are to return to Eindhoven for a music festival that will have the world’s top DJs traveling by helicopter from Amsterdam, Rotterdam and Eindhoven! Needless to say I am excited and cannot wait to share next weekend’s adventure with you!

Shopping mall

The blob!

Bowling art

Bowling art

Football (soccer) dome

Football (soccer) dome

Where next weekend's music festival will be held!

Where next weekend’s music festival will be held!

 

Church

Church

 

As always it is like a fairy tale returning back to Maastricht!

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Thank you for reading,

Corby Myers