Religion & Philosophy Department

Lebanon Valley College

Leah Schade: Eco-Theologian

In her ministry of environmental advocacy, Leah Schade has become a “fracktivist,” taking on the industry at such places as this drill rig in the Tiadaghton State Park in Lycoming Country, Pa.

In her ministry of environmental advocacy, Leah Schade has become a “fracktivist,” taking on the industry at such places as this drill rig in the Tiadaghton State Park in Lycoming Country, Pa.

For the past year, the Department of Religion and Philosophy at LVC has been privileged to have Dr. Leah Schade teaching for us.  She is a gifted and committed teacher, who is regularly teaching courses in Ethics.  Beginning next fall, she will offer a specialized course in “Religion, Ecology and Gender” that builds on her academic specialization in eco-theology and her ministry as an environmental activist.  The course probes the question about the different ways religion has provided us with both positive and negative models for conceptualizing embodiedness, sexuality, and relationality in terms of both human and biotic communities?  It will take an in-depth look at ecological theology and ecofeminism in the effort to understand the underlying causes of our current environmental crises.

The following is an excerpt from the April 2015 edition of The Lutheran magazine: http://www.thelutheran.org/article/article.cfm?article_id=12519%3Cbr%3E.  It provides an excellent profile of Schade and her work.


 

While growing up, Leah Schade experienced God’s presence in the forests of Pennsylvania as much as in church. But she couldn’t find a way to express her distress over environmental desecration until called to pastoral ministry.

“It was the arc of my theological awareness and sense of call to ministry that gave language to what I witnessed and the change I wanted to bring about,” she said.

Schade started an eco-ministry committee 10 years ago in her first congregation and more recently became an advocate and activist for environmental issues ranging from hydraulic fracturing (fracking) to clean air standards. She was also part of a successful attempt to defeat a proposed tire incinerator in her community of Milton, Pa.

Besides serving as pastor of United in Christ Lutheran Church in West Milton, Pa., she teaches courses and workshops in preaching, ecology and ethics and is an adjunct instructor in religion and philosophy at Lebanon Valley College, Annville, Pa.

In her ministry of environmental advocacy, Leah Schade has become a “fracktivist,” taking on the industry at such places as this drill rig in the Tiadaghton State Park in Lycoming Country, Pa.

In her upcoming book Creation-Crisis Preaching: Ecology, Theology and the Pulpit (Chalice Press), her goal is to “show how preaching can help give new life to God’s earth, and that God’s earth can give new life to preaching.” One goal of the book is developing a Lutheran eco-feminist Christology for preaching.

Environmental activism outside of the congregation is important to Schade, such as her service on the Upper Susquehanna Synod’s task force examining justice issues around shale gas drilling. This bipartisan group is made up of pastors, theologians, teachers, lay leaders, scientists and individuals who either worked in the industry or were favorable toward it.

After more than two years, they were able to agree that exemptions from regulations enjoyed by the fracking industry were unjust.

“In 2014 our synod assembly voted to ask our legislators to close the so-called ‘Halliburton Loophole’ and put the industry under the same laws as everyone else,” Schade said. “Fracking threatens water, air, public health and contributes to climate change. It is the ‘perfect storm’ of environmental devastation. Faith is absolutely essential to this work because it can be very depressing facing the devastating realities of ecocide.”

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