Lebanon Valley College New Students

Project CLOSE-UP

Would I be good in real estate or research? Do I have to manage money in this job? Will I be at a desk all day? With what kinds of people will I work? What types of writing skills will I need? Must I get an advanced degree before pursuing this line of work? What types of assignments can I expect? Do social workers really get paid next to nothing? Are there courses I should take in order to make me more qualified for this job? Who are my peers on the job?

Project CLOSE-UP, the career shadowing program for first-year students only, is a unique opportunity to gain exposure to jobs and workplaces with volunteer alumni Career Connections mentors. Shadowing a professional in the workplace is one of the best ways to learn what a job is really like–from the inside.

During Project CLOSE-UP you will have the chance to spend a day with an alumnus of LVC at their place of work. Your day could include a tour of the organization, talks with various people who work there, and observations of a typical day’s duties, meetings or programs. This is the time for asking all the questions that some people wish they’d asked before they were hired.

This opportunity for first-year students could be of particular benefit to open majors, but all majors are welcome to apply. Check out the details at PROJECT CLOSE-UP and begin making plans to participate in this program in the spring 2015 semester.

What can I do with this major?

what can i do with this majorSo, have you chosen your major?  Are you satisfied with your choice?  Are you beginning to think that maybe you would prefer a different course of study?  Would the addition of a complementary second major or minor enhance your studies?

If you answered ‘yes’ to any of these questions, you are in great company.  It is quite commonplace for college students to be uncertain about their choice of a major even when they have declared one.  Some studies suggest that up to 50% of college students who have chosen a major will change to another one. For some, making changes to their major happens two or three times.

There are all kinds of reasons why changing majors happens frequently.  Sometimes it is because students find themselves struggling academically or they find the subject matter no longer holds their interest. Sometimes they realize the initial choice of a major was made for the wrong reason(s). Occasionally students find they’ve become inspired by a professor or class that unearths a passion within they didn’t even know existed.  Still others find their desire to increase their employability after college is leading them to consider other options.

Do you need some help?

College is a great time of discovery and most students – decided or undecided – have much to learn and discover about their values, skills, goals, interests, and personality. If you want to make a wise choice regarding a future career path, knowing your strengths, weaknesses, and preferences is fundamental.

Thus, you may find some of our assessment tools to be a big help in clarifying your preferences, identifying potential career options, and suggesting potential majors that would be good choices in preparing for those options. Opportunities to talk over your career plans or lack of them with a career counselor are also available; contact the Center for Career Development to make an appointment.

What Can I Do with This Major is an excellent resource for exploring possibilities. Use it to learn about the typical career areas associated with ninety-four (94) different majors.  Not all of the majors listed on the handy chart are available at LVC, but many are.  For those that are not, you might want to consider exploring the possibility of a self-designed major.  That could be a great conversation to have with your academic advisor.

Advice I like

College should be about studying something you enjoy and do well in.  It is a time for developing your strengths and honing skills that will enable you to use those strengths to their fullest.

“Find a major that makes you intellectually engaged, that expands your brain and deepens your understanding of the world,” says advisor Mary Beth Collier of SUNY New Paltz.  Most employers are looking for transferable skills — the ability to solve problems, work in teams, write and communicate, and think critically. These can be developed in any discipline. It makes no sense, she says, to “suffer through a major” because you think it will lead to employment.   Moreover, it is difficult to predict the employment market.  “Four years from now,” she says Michele Campagna, the executive director of the Center for Advising and Student Transitions at Montclair State, “freshmen will be applying for jobs that don’t even exist today.”

When in doubt, seek assistance.  Most LVC professors and administrators have been confused or uncertain about the choices before them at one time or another.  With years of experience in decision-making they just may have a few tips to help you think clearly and act prudently with respect to your selection of a major and vocational focus.

 

 

Center for Writing and Tutoring Resources

The Writing Center will open for desk hours on Monday, September 8th. Desk hours have been expanded from 6-10pm, Monday through Thursday.

The Residential Tutoring Program will begin on Sunday, September 7th. Writing tutors will be on duty in the lounge of the following dorms:

Day Time Residence Hall Tutor on Duty
Sunday 8:00-10:00pm Mary Green Ryan
Monday 8:00-10:00pm Hammond Emily
Tuesday 8:00-10:00pm Keister Brittany
Wednesday 8:00-10:00pm Funk West Sara

Group review sessions are now set for specific classes. These sessions will also start on Sunday, September 7th.

Class Tutor Day(s) Time Location
ACT 161:  Financial Accounting Dominick DuVernois, djd007@lvc.edu Tuesdays 7:00-8:30pm Group Study Room 003D, LLC
BIO 111: General Biology I Various Tri-Beta members Sundays and Thursdays 6:00-8:00pm Neidig-Garber 203
BIO 201: Genetics  Brad Krisanits, bak005@lvc.edu Tuesdays and Thursdays 7:00-8:30pm Group Study Room 003E, LLC
CHM 111: Principles of Chemistry Steve Donmoyer, psd003@lvc.edu Mondays and Wednesdays 7:00-9:00pm HUM 302
CHM 213: Organic Chemistry Ben Carpenter, bac004@lvc.edu Mondays and Wednesdays 7:00-9:00pm Group Study Room 003E, LLC
ECN 101: Principles of Microeconomics Matt Czuj, mjc007@lvc.edu Tuesdays 7:00-9:00pm Group Study Room 003C, LLC
MAS 170: Elementary Statistics Katrina Zervanos, kmz001@lvc.edu Thursdays 6:00-8:00pm Group Study Room 003C, LLC
PHY 103: General College Physics I Nick Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 pm Lynch 170

If you need to request a tutor you may do so by calling 717-867-6799 or by filling out an online tutor request form: http://www.lvc.edu/writing-tutoring/tutor-request.aspx

Center for Career Development…Get in the Habit

LebegernLearningCommons1The Career e-bulletin arrives in your e-mail inbox every Monday.  What are you doing with those messages?

  • I open and read them.  At first I wasn’t quite sure what to expect, but now I have a good idea of what the Center for Career Development (CCD) does and am amazed at all the helpful resources available. E-bulletin points out a new resources each week, directs me to the weekly Career Blog that reads like a conversation I might have if I was talking to a member of the staff,  and keeps me current on career programs as well as jobs/internships posted in my JobCenter account. I need a little advice from time to time and certainly need help keeping myself organized.

I read something about Project CLOSE-UP, a program just for freshmen, on the Career Development website.  And, I want to find out more about JobCenter and see if it is OK for freshmen to go to some of the career fairs they advertise.

CCD responds:  Excellent!  Drop by and introduce yourself when you are in the Lebegern Learning Commons.  We’d be happy to answer your questions and show you how to get the most from JobCenter.  In fact, you can get started learning about it right now. That’s why we created the JobCenter Tutorial for Students,  a crash course tour that introduces the resource’s many features and tools.

Glad to know you are enjoying the Career Blog.  We’re impressed you’ve been on the Center for Career Development website too.

  • I simply delete them.

CCD responds: You might want to reconsider.

Get in the habit of using JobCenter and regularly reading E-bulletin and the Career Blog for tips, ideas, leads, and opportunities. It’s like having your own personal career coach!

Making your LVC Experience the Best: Advice from Students Living Far from Home

Adjusting to College life can be challenging for new students, no matter how far from home they might have traveled. But for students who are so far from home that they might not get to go home until winter break, it has an added dimension of possible homesickness. Two Lebanon Valley College students offer their own advice about how to make that transition a successful one.

Megan Schoch is a Class of 2014 graduate from Naperville, Illinois, who offers the following tips:

  • Get involved! Whether this mean a sports team, club, fraternity/sorority, etc. This is a great way to meet friends and to feel a sense of family while you are far away from your own.
  • Take advantage of being in a new place. Explore your surroundings, go on road trips, visit a friend’s hometown, etc. This is a great way to broaden your horizons and understand other areas than your own.
  • Understand that it is okay to be alone sometimes. College is all about learning how to be independent and this is even more common in students who are far away from home.
  • Open up and get to know others. It is very unlikely that your parents will be able to attend every single concert, game, or event that you may be participating in. Use this as an opportunity to not only get to know your teammates/club members better but also their parents and family members. It is always a great feeling knowing that you have other people in your life that would be willing to help you.
  • Always plan ahead! This is key for traveling when you live far away. Whether this means booking flights or planning out your drive home, it is a necessity if you want to keep your travel expenses affordable.
  • Take advantage of having friends who live near school. The reality is that travel is expensive and time consuming. If you have the opportunity to go home with a friend for a school break/vacation then do it! Not only does it save you money but it will provide you with memories that you will never forget.
  • Be proud of going to LVC. If any of you are like myself, no one from my area has any idea what Lebanon Valley College is. Although this may be discouraging at times, tell them why you chose to go there and why you are proud to be a Dutchmen. In reality it doesn’t matter if they have heard of LVC or not, the only thing that matters is that you love being a student there and have never regretted your decision to attend college there.
  • Balance is key. Learn how to balance your academics, friends, relationships, and sports/extra-curricular activities. It seems like a daunting task at first but once you get into a routine it becomes simple. Do not revolve your entire life around academics because I guarantee that you will regret not spending some time getting to know other people and being a college student.
  • Cherish the time you have at the valley. When you come in freshman year it seems like an eternity until graduation day but it comes much quicker than you think. Take advantage of every opportunity and live life to the fullest. School is important of course but I guarantee that you will remember late night hangouts with your best friends more than the A you received on a quiz that you studied all night for.
  • On a final note, remember that academics is the priority but make sure to make time for your friends, take advantage of opportunities such as studying abroad, be a part of a group/team/club, and make a stamp on LVC in your own way. As a recent graduate of LVC, I miss being a Dutchmen every day and do not have a single regret. Now it’s your turn.

James (Andy) Thurby is from Fenton, Missouri, and a member of the ice hockey and lacrosse teams. Here’s his advice:

While traveling, don’t keep to yourself, whether you are driving or flying. The time goes by much faster if you interact with people. Whether it be on the phone, or with the person next to you on the plane. You never know who you may run into. They could have studied the same subject in school, or even played a sport. This past thanksgiving, I was actually on a flight with a hockey player from the Naval Academy… small world

Arriving at school, participate in at least some of the freshmen activities! Even if you are on a sports team, it is good to know as many faces as possible. A smiling face is always welcome, don’t be afraid to smile or even start a conversation because chances are, everyone else is just as nervous as you. Participate in class, be social, go out and have fun on the weekends. As important as school it’s the social interactions that will make you want to stay here

Homesickness is going to happen. Plain and simple. It’s good to keep up communications with everyone from home but don’t overdo it, it can just make it worse. You made the choice to come here, so be here. Interact with the people here. If you internalize this homesickness and continue to call home all the time it only compounds the feelings.

It’s good to get away from home. In new parts of the country, you are forced to grow up faster. You are immersed into different cultures and views. I have personally lived in Missouri, Vermont, Alaska, and now good ole central PA. All are different and wonderful in their own way. Stick with it, and don’t bail just because you had a rough semester. If you run back home, you may never get another opportunity to live wherever you please and get a good education.

Extended Orientation – Workshops

We want you to have a great start to your college experience. Four additional workshops have been added this fall to help with this exciting transition to college. The workshops, facilitated by your Peer Mentors, will help you in the following areas:

  • Time management skills
  • Communicating with faculty and peers
  • Financial Aid
  • Registering for classes
Sunday, September 7th Developing Effective Time Management Skills
Wednesday, October 15th Communicating Effectively with Faculty and Peers
Tuesday, October 28th Understanding the Financial Aid Process
Sunday, November 16th Advising and Registration: A How-To-Guide

Each session will take place from 9:00 pm until 10:00 pm in the Mund Dining Room.

Reach out to your Peer Mentor for more information.

 

 

Saturday Trips!

From community service projects to student led clubs and organizations, we want your experience to be fun and engaging.

The LVC Student Programming Board plans and implements a variety of events including Saturday trips! Saturday trips are typically free or very low-cost and open to all LVC students. The first Saturday trip of the year is to Camelbeach Mountain Resort.  Students MUST register to attend. So how do you sign up?

It’s simple:

1)      Log onto myLVC

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2) Under the myCampus tab click on RedBook Events

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3) Sign up for the events you are interested in attending. And remember some trips and events are limited to a specific number of students.

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4) Have fun, stay informed, and enjoy!

Introducing Community Service and Volunteerism

Welcome to LVC!

This summer in the Office of Community Service & Volunteerism we’re making preparations for you to begin to experience the joy of serving as early as Orientation Weekend.  A two-hour service project scheduled for Sunday afternoon will introduce you to 15 student-led service organizations at LVC.  It’s going to be a meaningful time.

Community service is meaningful, joy-producing, and noble. It can also help you to get a job.  For all these reasons, students at LVC are encouraged to participate in LVC’s Community Service Awards. Three levels of achievement are available for inclusion in a student’s personal profile on LVC’s Job Center:

  • Students who perform 25 qualified hours of community service during their tenure at LVC receive a Bronze Community Service Award.
  • Students who perform 60 hours of qualified service are awarded a Silver Community Service Award.
  • Students who perform 100 hours of qualified service received a Gold Community Service Award.

Hours are submitted by a report available online at our Web site.  Once it is determined that the hours qualify according to LVC’s Service Hour Guidelines, they are recorded.

Detailed information regarding upcoming events is available via Facebook. Join the groups “Community Service” (for one-time service events) and “Volunteerism” (for on-going opportunities) at www.facebook.com/about/groups/schools.

The Start of New Student Orientation

Can you believe tomorrow is the official start day for all new students! Here are a few things to remember about the start of orientation:

  • Residence halls will open tomorrow, Thursday, August 21st starting at 8 a.m. Commuting students should check-in at 10:00 am in the Mund College Center.
  • If you are living on campus you should report directly to your residence hall and pick up your room key. If you do not know your housing assignment, report to the College Center for assistance.
  • After getting settled in your room, please go to the Mund College Center to find additional resources regarding your Dutchman Onecard, vehicle registration, banking, cable television, and computers.

Last but not least follow your New Student Orientation Schedule! This will be your guide to important activities and sessions taking place.

We are excited to have you join the rest of the LVC community tomorrow.