Career Services

Lebanon Valley College

Local to Global: Annville to Shanghai

Within the past decades, China has grown to become the world’s second largest economy, fast surpassing that of its rivals in an explosion of economic expansion. This economic status has led to increases in the consumption of education and luxury goods, trademark developments of a developed country. The internationalization of the Chinese culture includes an increased marketability of both Mandarin and experience in the East Asian world. Through the work of the Center for Global Education, Lebanon Valley College is now proud to offer a study abroad program to Shanghai, China.

Studying abroad in Shanghai, in comparison to the other European programs that the college offers, can appear daunting due to the extremity of the cultural and linguistic differences. Fortunately MyWorldAbroad has several resources that will be very helpful in alleviating any pre-departure anxiety. Under the ‘Top Resources’ section are a series of country guides (specific by region) and tips on travel smarts to help educate students on the norms of their destination. Unique to this study abroad experience is an optional internship opportunity, and students can learn about international internships and the expectations of other countries through the ‘What Do You Want to Do?’ > “Intern Abroad” sections.

Most helpful to students is the 4 Big Things tab, which divides the site into two sections; studying abroad (‘While in School’) and working abroad (‘While Looking for Work’). In this area, students can access all of the site’s articles that pertain to studying abroad, which discuss not only preparation for the study abroad experience, but how to speak professionally about a semester abroad once they return. By making an effort to examine and understand these unique aspects of other cultures (and understanding the quirks of American culture!), students can become adjusted faster, alleviate homesickness, and have an overall better experience!  Happy Travels.

-Marie Gorman, student assistant for the Center for Career Development

MyWorldAbroad: Why Me?

Students are constantly being bombarded with databases and resources that are supposed to make their lives simpler and research process easier.  The number of options can be overwhelming, and each additional program seems to make things more complicated.  Thankfully, MyWorldAbroad is not another endless database but a searchable academic site comprised of informative content.

As a student interested in going abroad, MyWorld Abroad can inform you of the cultural norms of a country before you arrive. Many students fear appearing “like a stereotypical American” or an outsider, and can fear the cultural divide more than the communicative divide. Tips sheets and the stories of others who have already been abroad can help travelers to understand the perceptions of their host nation and learn to better adapt to these norms.

Students who have already been abroad may be interested in finding ways to finalize or formalize their experience. By submitting to the MyWorldBlog, students have the possibility of earning a monetary reward by writing about their time abroad.  Two entire sections of the site are devoted to writing and speaking about study abroad experiences for the workplace, and also provide advice about the international application and hiring process.

Students who are not interested in going abroad may be interested in the country guides, which allow students to grow their international intelligence (IQ). These are organized by country, and can be used in the classroom and for assignments that require knowledge about world regions and the latest significant events. Guides can range from economics and international trade routes to feminism and the treatment of women in the Middle East. The variety of resources ranges from online articles to books to movies.

If you have a question about the world we live in, MyWorldAbroad has an answer. Simply head to the website for the Center for Career Development to get started!

- Marie Gorman, student assistant with the Center for Career Development

Discover who you are… and where you want to go

Is there a “test’ for that?

Fortunately, yes.  Unfortunately, no.  Or maybe it’s the other way around.

Certainly assessment instruments like the Myers Briggs Type Indicator, Strong Interest Inventory, SkillScan, and StrengthsFinder have a role to play in helping students discover themselves.  They can confirm aspects of personality, skills, interests, and values that you likely already know about yourself, but perhaps have never been able to put into words.  They also can reveal aspects of yourself you’ve yet to discover because you’ve been so busy trying to be someone else – the person you think you should be – as well as offer ideas of work environments and/or career paths in which you are likely to thrive.

The down side is that too many students look to assessment tools to provide them with answers. Answers that are right and sure and convenient.  Answers that will fix the nagging fears associated with not knowing what they can or should do.

I love these assessment tools.  They can serve you well.  But nothing replaces self-assessment.  Only thing is that takes time and “a willingness to jettison preconceived notions about success” (Smart Moves for Liberal Arts Grads, p. 30).  Introspection does not come easily to many but with the help of a good listener whether friend, parent, advisor, or career counselor, students can begin to discover direction as they discover themselves.

I encourage you to do a little self-assessment activity each day.  You might begin by keeping a journal in which you record thoughts or observations as they apply to your career.  Of course, you’ll have to first begin paying attention – noticing – what’s happening internally as you respond to various external events stimuli.  Another activity might be to begin asking family, trusted friends, or mentors to give you honest feedback about how they perceive you as a leader, follower, friend, student, or employee. What do they notice about your strengths?  Where are your contributions most evident? Where could you use a little polish? What, in their estimation, may potentially hold you back from truly succeeding? What suggestions do they have for you to work on or consider? What specifically do they notice that makes you happy? Proud? Keep a record of this feedback as it likely will begin to reveal a pattern to help you see yourself more clearly.

As always, we are here to help.

-Sharon M. Givler, director, career development

Your Preferences: Finding your Fit

What do you want?

Aside from articulating your strengths and crafting stories that let your experiences shine, there’s another area that shouldn’t be overlooked in your career planning. It’s not just about what employers are seeking, it’s also about what you want and need to succeed.

A job search is all about fit and match. You can say the perfect things to get yourself hired, but if you aren’t being true to yourself, it may not be very long before your find yourself applying elsewhere. Take some time to think about your work preferences:

  • What type of working environment are you looking for?
  • Under what management style do you best thrive?
  • Do you prefer working in teams or independently?
  • Would you be ok if you only see your boss once a week?
  • What kind of challenges excite you?
  • What are some of your personal values and how do they fit in with your professional endeavors?
  • How does a position fit within your long term personal and professional goals?

Although you may not have a professional point of reference to analyze, think about instances (in the classroom, on the field, as a leader, in an internship, etc) where you have felt supported, and at your best. What were some of the factors contributing to that? Perhaps seeking similar factors in a work environment would keep you engaged.

Before you start crossing possibilities off your list, however, keep in mind: you may not find your “ideal” right away, you also are a contributing factor in your work environment, there will be an adjustment period no matter what, and sometimes it’s best to get out of your comfort zone entirely. Don’t get so caught up in finding a match for all of your preferences that you miss out on the perfect career fit for right now.

~Gwen Miller, associate director, career development

Where are You in Your Career Planning?

When it comes to your job or internship search, your approach, your goals, your networking, your applications, etc. will be tailored to you and your chosen industry.

Three pieces of advice that apply to everyone, however, is to stay positive, keep going, and be open-minded!  Job searching takes persistence and a willingness to explore.  It also, of course, takes time!  Give yourself plenty of time to learn about opportunities and tailor each application. Several CareerSpots videos address the importance of Being OPEN to Opportunities, Making Career Fairs Counts, Starting Early, and more.

Additionally, think about the following:

  • What do you know about yourself? Can you clearly state your goals, strengths, and preferences in a work environment? Are you able to explain your accomplishments from your college involvement, work activities, internships, or volunteerism as they relate to the working world?
  • What do you know about employers? Have you identified industries of interest, companies within those industries, and potential positions that appeal to you? Have you organized your search activities to help you track when you apply, when you should follow up, and the status of each position? Is your job search public? Meaning, have you spoken with your family, friends, faculty, past employers, mentors, etc. to help you brainstorm and learn about opportunities?
  • Are your materials and interviewing techniques up to par? Have you had your resume reviewed, learned about effective cover letters and other correspondence, and practiced interviewing techniques?

Clearly there is a lot that goes into the job and internship search, and the same is true for those interested in graduate school.  As such, I would add be prepared to the three pieces of advice mentioned earlier! Utilize Career Services’ Resources for Students to get started and include us in your search activities!

Gwen Miller, associate director, career services

 

Resources for your Interests

Between all the books, websites, and people available to you that offer knowledge and insight into the world of work, it’s easy to get overwhelmed.  Lessen the “information overload” by targeting your efforts on resources that more directly pertain to your interests.

Professional Associations – If you’ve yet to consider the networking potential and insider knowledge that can be gained from a professional association, I’d urge you to look into it. Unsure where to start?  I recently learned of Weddle’s Association Directorywww.weddles.com/associations – that offers an entryway into tons of organization websites.

  • Did you know there are seven Economics associations? Eight in Sports Recreation? How about four separate categories related to Diversity – Diversity/Disabilities, Diversity/Ethnicity, Diversity/Gender, and Diversity/Religion.

The list goes on.  Once you’ve found an association of interest, explore their website.  You may be able to access information on industry trends, educational resources, and publications just by browsing the site.  Or, consider becoming a member to view more in-depth information, be invited to events, and gain access to job boards or membership directories.  You may even find that there are discounts on student membership rates!

Professional Associations offer direct access to your industry.  Take advantage of them!

Industry (Subscription) Resources – Career Services offers several industry specific resources:

  • ARTSEARCH – the national employment bulletin for the arts, published by Theatre Communications Group
  • Internships USA – considered one of  the most comprehensive sources of internship information on the web
  • Environmental Career Opportunities – a bi-weekly electronic newsletter with hundreds of job vacancies in environmental policy, conservation, education, and engineering.
  • Bridge Worldwide Music Connection – maintained by the New England Conservatory’s Career Services Center, this resource provides access to thousands of opportunities in music and arts administration.
  • Opportunities in Public Affairs – find Capitol Hill jobs, government affairs, legislative and policy jobs, public relations, communications and fundraising; research, writing, and journalism jobs, etc.
  • MyWorldAbroad – want to go abroad, study, volunteer, intern, teach, or work? Check out this extensive resource!

You can create your own account in MyWorldAbroad using your LVC email address; the other subscriptions require a username and password that can be acquired by contacting Career Services or going into the Resource Library of your JobCenter account.

Information is necessary in your career planning; but don’t get overwhelmed.  Target your research and get more focused results!

~Gwen Miller, associate director, career services

Fun Snow Day Activities

What do you do when your schedule has been turned upside down due to bad weather?

  1. Go outside and build a snowman
  2. Go ice skating on the sidewalks or in parking lots
  3. Study and catch up (or get a head start) on homework or projects
  4. Think about your future
  5. Watch movies or read all day

Well…you probably shouldn’t try the ice skating one…that’s REALLY not safe, nor is it helpful to those trying to clear up the mess. But the other four options? Not bad ways to spend a day.

Surely you saw this coming though – in Career Services, we certainly advocate for option 4, at least for a portion of the day. Since you’re stuck inside anyway though, why not do a little more than just think about your future? Do something that helps you work toward it!

A few fun ideas:

  1. Create an account in FOCUS-2. Complete inventories in this computerized assessment tool that are meant to help you identify and evaluate your goals, interests, strengths, and personality as they relate to your career choices and planning. Call me a bit of a nerd, but I do actually think learning about yourself is fun. Once you create an account in FOCUS-2, you’ll get an email inviting you to make an appointment to talk with us about your results. Please do!
  2. Update your resume. Don’t laugh. I really do find it fun! Think about it – your resume is a chance to highlight your past experiences in a way that demonstrates your abilities. It’s also a record of things you’ve been involved in, achievements you’ve earned, and accomplishments you’re proud of. Basically, it’s one piece of paper that offers prompts and reminders of many of your life’s stories.
  3. Investigate career stuff. This is the perfect day to browse the internet looking at career options, professional associations, companies that you’ve passed on a drive but have never heard of, profiles of Career Connections mentors, etc. It’s a lot more fun to investigate the world of work when it’s because you have a few hours to kill than when you are in a decision-making crisis. Besides, you might learn about a career you’d never heard of before, making this snow day the turning point in your future.

Ok, I get it. Ideas for snowmen are brewing, movies and books are practically calling to you, and homework deadlines are pressing. There are a lot of things you can do when bad weather strikes. So consider this: go build that snowman, make a big dent in your homework, and then split your afternoon/evening between some of the fun activities of reading, movies, and thinking about your future.

And before you ask, no, “accomplished snowman builder” cannot go on your resume.

Gwen Miller, associate director, career services

The Key to Career Planning: Know Yourself

We recommend networking, we encourage informational interviewing, and we stress the importance of gaining experience.  All are instrumental in exploration and planning for your future career or graduate school pursuits.  After all, you need to see what’s out there before you can determine your path!

However, not all exploration is external.  Don’t forget about self-discovery, the exploration of your own values, attributes, strengths, and preferences.  You can become familiar with many different work environments and companies, but if you haven’t taken the time to really identify what’s important to you and what you have to offer, it’s nearly impossible to know when you’ve found your fit.

Self-discovery isn’t something that you can block off a few hours for, write a report, and cross off of your to-do list; it takes continual thought and reflection to be able to understand yourself, let alone be able to articulate your qualities to other people!

To help get started, Richard Bolles offers the following advice in the well-known job search book: What Color is Your Parachute? (2012 edition, pages 190-191).   In helping a person to define what their “dream job” is, he suggests describing yourself in the following ways:

  1. What can you do – your favorite functional/transferable skills
  2. What do you know – your favorite knowledge or fields of interests
  3. What kinds of people do you like to be surrounded by – the kinds of people you like to help
  4. Where are you most effective – the surroundings or working conditions that enable you to do your best work

These can be surprisingly difficult to define, especially if you haven’t explored favorites in any of these topics!  The following exercise suggested in Bolles’ book might be an even better starting place:

  1. Take ten sheets of blank paper and write “Who Am I” at the top of each
  2. Write one answer to that question on each one (to help get you started, think of roles you play or identify with, attributes you use to describe yourself, etc…)
  3. Go back and write why you said that and what excites you most by it.  If you say you’re creative, give an example or explain why that was one of the answers that came to mind.
  4. Then, look back at those ten sheets and prioritize them by level of importance to help gain an understanding of what you value most, are most proud of, or identify with the strongest.

Of course this is not a perfect system.  You won’t be given the key to success once you put that last sheet into place.  But it will do a number of things for you:

If you struggled to get to that tenth answer (or even the fourth or fifth!), you know you have some work to do.  How can you explain why you’re the best candidate if you can’t quite explain who you are and what you’re best at?  In this case, think of how others describe you; think of how you introduce yourself; think of what you aspire to be – this may help you get past writer’s block.

On the other hand, if you found it easy to come up with ten, great!  You know yourself pretty well (although there is much more to you than 10 things).  Bolles suggests that you then look for common themes throughout your answers.  This might help you to better define what your “dream job” really means to you, thus helping you to target your career or graduate school planning a bit more intentionally.  Then, build on these discoveries to flesh out examples and build a story bank.  Doing so will certainly help you put together a more compelling application and present yourself more confidently and competently when going after that dream!

Gwen Miller, associate director, career services

Spotlighting The Campus Career Coach

It’s the third Wednesday of November – do you know what that means?  That means in 8 days, we can all celebrate Thanksgiving!  It also means it’s the week that our Career Services Blog serves the purpose of offering advice on preparing for the job search.  This week, my method of accomplishing that is to actually refer you to a different Blog!

Have you passed by the window to the Career Services office this semester and been momentarily distracted by our signs?  Good! Often backed by bright blue paper and hanging from a 4-foot stand, those signs are put up by our office assistant, Sue, who takes the responsibility of finding interesting, often humorous, and always relevant career articles or images for your reading pleasure. They’re resources that catch her eye or make her laugh.  The latest? An image of this little girl:

Campus Career Coach girl

that emphasizes an article titled “Be a Selective Job Seeker, not a Picky Job Seeker.”  The article comes from The Campus Career Coach, a Blog that strives to offer practical answers to career questions for college students.

You should know that in writing this Blog post, I went to The Campus Career Coach to find a few articles that I could highlight to entice you to go there yourself.  I’ve been immersed in the content for the past half hour or so!  I started reading his advice on bullet points vs. paragraphs in resumes; then the article When is the right time for a college senior to start looking for a job? held my attention.  Then, I actually found myself watching a video on tools that welders need….(I’m not a welder…but it’s nice to know that I could find out what the essential equipment is to becoming one!).

Then I noticed that the top of the page includes a navigation bar that consists of Job Search Guides that are nice supplements to our TIP Sheets, more than 30 resumes in a Resume Gallery, an alphabetical listing of Professional Associations, great advice on how to Get your Foot in the Door of different careers, and something titled Coach’s Soapbox (really – how could you not want to see what that consists of?!).  I also found a TED Talk that I plan to watch later called The Happy Secret to Better Work (such a promising title!) under the category: I Love My Job.

Hopefully I’ve convince you to check this Blog out and make reading it a regular habit.  Just be sure that you have some time to spare before you begin to browse!

Gwen Miller, associate director, career services

Where in the world will YOU go?

Lebanon Valley College graduates find themselves studying and working all over the place.  Sometimes they remain in Central Pennsylvania; sometimes they go across the globe.  It’s fascinating and fun for the College to learn of the stories that explain what took one alumnus one way vs. another.  As a student, you may also be wondering what’s out there and how you can expand upon your own career story.  Perhaps there is a city you dream of, a state that excites you, or a study abroad destination that you yearn to return to.

Often times, when someone is telling a career story, the ignition point (the way in which the path was influenced or determined) is a resource they learned of, a networking connection they happened to make, a dream that they turned into a plan, a situation that set off a series of events, etc.  Whatever the case, it has to start somewhere!  Unfortunately, I can’t introduce you to networking contacts through a Blog (unless you’d like me to tell you about Career Connections, an online mentoring program that connects current students to LVC alumni and parents who have volunteered to offer career guidance…), nor can I turn your dream into a plan (although I could start by referring you to our TIP Sheet on Preparing Students to Reach Employment Destinations), but I can certainly introduce you to a few (more) resources!

Your JobCenter account will connect you with jobs or internships that employers post.  It will also give you access to an employer directory that introduces you to companies who have recruited here in the past, as well as a Resource Library with oodles of folders on employers or internship programs to check out.  Still, you may be interested in broadening your search considerably to focus on a specific industry or area.  There are hundreds, probably thousands, of websites out there to help facilitate your search; so many, in fact, that it’s easy to feel overwhelmed.  Although we don’t endorse one over another, nor can anyone claim that one website casts a net broad enough to capture every opportunity, one site we would encourage you to take a look at is Urban Employ.

Urban Employ posts thousands of internships and jobs in major metropolitan regions for businesses, nonprofits, and governments.  Interested in Atlanta? Chicago? Denver? Los Angeles? New York? Philadelphia? Search for positions representing 75+ fields in 25 major metropolitan areas.  It certainly isn’t the only website out there, but it’s a great starting place!

Looking to travel a bit further? Say…overseas to study, volunteer, intern, teach, or work?  Our office has partnered with the office of Study Abroad and the Bishop Library to offer My World Abroad, a vast resource for our students and graduates to utilize.  When I say vast, I mean vast enough to have necessitated the creation of a User’s Guide to give users a glimpse of what they’ll see when they create an account and log in!  I can’t even begin to describe all of the information you can gain by spending some time browsing; instead, I’ll offer a snapshot of the “table of contents” that will likely persuade anyone interested in leading their career story abroad to investigate further:

MyWorldAbroad Contents

 

So, although we cannot be the authors of your career story, the office of career services will gladly offer you resources, a listening ear, advice and guidance on your professional development and pursuits, and always, always, always, a place where you can share and celebrate the events of your story, whether they take you down the road, across the country, or half-way across the world!

~Gwen Miller, associate director, career services